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Cochrane systematic review answers only some questions on topical steroids use in eczema

4th April 2022

Use of topical steroids in atopic eczema was examined in Cochrane review but only answered some relevant clinical usage questions

A Cochrane review on the use of topical steroids, has offered some, but not all, of the answers to help clinicians and patients to use these drugs optimally in the treatment of adults and children with atopic eczema, despite the fact that these agents have been used in practice for many decades.

Atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis) is defined as a chronic, itchy, inflammatory skin condition that affects people of all ages, although it presents most frequently in childhood. According to NICE guidance, which, although focusing on children, is applicable to adults, emollients should form the mainstay of atopic eczema management and should always be used, even when the condition has cleared. Where the disease flares, NICE advocates a stepped approach to management involving the use of emollients and topical steroids. The first use of topical steroids, in the form of cortisone acetate ointment (referred to as compound F) was reported in 1952 and topical steroids are categorised in terms of their potency which ranges from mild, moderate, potent and very potent with more potent agents inducing a greater degree of skin blanching (i.e., vasoconstriction). They are also available in different strengths and formulations, e.g., creams, ointments and foams, with designed to be used only once daily.

Nevertheless, despite the widespread availability of the drugs, there is surprising lack of clarity on how to best use topical steroids in clinical practice. The purpose of the current Cochrane review was therefore to try and answer several relevant questions to support clinicians and patients. In trying to answer these questions, the review included only randomised controlled trials in adults and children with eczema and which compared at least two strategies of topical corticosteroid use.

Optimal use of topical steroids

A total of 104 trials with 8443 participants were included in the analysis although 55 trials had a high risk of bias in at least one domain, mostly due to lack of blinding or missing outcome data.

The use of moderate compared to mild potency topical steroids resulted in more participants achieving treatment success, which was defined as cleared or marked improvement in eczema, based on an investigator global assessment scale (odds ratio, OR = 2.07, 95% CI 1.41 – 3.04).

In trials assessing adults and children with moderate or severe eczema, the use of potent topical steroids once compared to twice daily, did not reduce the number of patients achieving treatment success (OR = 0.97, 95% CI 0.68 – 1.38).

One strategy advocated by the NHS is weekend treatment, where a person whose eczema is under control, uses the topical corticosteroid every weekend on the trouble sites to prevent a disease relapse. flare. The review found supportive evidence for this approach and concluded that this resulted in a large decrease in likelihood of a relapse from 58% to 25% (risk ratio, RR = 0.43, 95% CI 0.32 – 0.57).

Another area explored included whether to use a cream or ointment formulation but there was no evidence to support use of either formulation. Advice from the NHS is that if a topical corticosteroid is prescribed, patients should wait about 15–30 mins after applying an emollient before using topical steroids. However, the review found no evidence to support this recommendation.

Although the Cochrane review provided some answers to support clinicians in their use of topical steroids, as the authors noted, there was a lack of evidence on adverse effects since studies were small and did not always use the most reliable methods. Therefore, the review offers some, but not all, of the answers to support the optimal use of topical steroids.

Citation
Lax SJ et al. Strategies for using topical corticosteroids in children and adults with eczema. Cochrane Database Sys Rev; March 2022