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Hospital Healthcare Europe

IT to play a bigger part in radiology


31 July, 2009  

In order to increase productivity, healthcare providers have started to integrate many IT-based ancillary systems such as EMR, HIS and PACS. So far, this has purely been a service-oriented business, in which IT systems have accelerated healthcare practices. However, the lack of qualified staff, such as technologists, physicians and radiologists is creating a challenge for hospitals. A huge number of radiological examinations and the interpretation of images has to take place, and many hospitals are outsourcing this work to speed up productivity.

Radiology Informatics will help to eliminate this problem. Unlike other service-based ancillary systems, Radiology Informatics is an artificial intelligence system that will interpret images generated by various imaging modalities. Its aim is to assist radiologists in arriving at a quicker interpretation and also contribute towards recommending other necessary actions for concomitant requirements. Reporting errors, wrong interpretations, and patient report delays due to an unavailability of radiologists will eventually be eliminated.

The Healthcare Group at Frost & Sullivan will therefore focus its 2009 Quarterly Analyst Briefing Presentation on the global market for Radiology Informatics. The briefing will be held on Wednesday, 5th August 2009, at 2 p.m. GMT.

“The market for Radiology Informatics is in its nascent stage, requiring extensive research backed by funding,” says Frost & Sullivan Research Analyst Shriram Shanmugham. “These systems represent the future though.”

This briefing presentation will be of significant value to venture capitalists and healthcare IT companies looking to expand its product portfolio through innovation. CEOs, corporate vice-presidents for product development, research directors and clinical research managers will benefit from this presentation, as well as professors and post-doctoral students in biomedical and computer engineering.

Frost & Sullivan